Admin

Y8 Past Expeditions

Expeditions from the past

Spring 2014 - Four Freedoms

In the Four Freedoms expedition, York 8 students will explore concepts of freedom by first looking at Norman Rockwell’s famous paintings of the four freedoms, printed in the Saturday Evening Post in 1943. These paintings -- Freedom from Want, Freedom from Fear, Freedom of Speech, and Freedom from Worship -- were inspired by Franklin Roosevelt’s State of the Union speech in 1941. As students examine these images and their historical context, they study the concepts and meanings of the same freedoms today through a variety of reading assignments, discussions with guest lecturers, movies and other research. Students then express their personal experiences and reflections on the ideas of freedom through a variety of writing and visual art projects, culminating with the Freedom Collages exhibited on First Friday Art Walk in June. Based on imagery gathered from a variety of contemporary media and commercial sources, the Freedom Collages are striking commentaries about how students view the nature of freedom in the world today.

Fall 2013 - Engineering Your Energy Future
Will there be enough energy for our future? What source of energy is the best for our environment? Which source is the cheapest? Who is using the energy and what are they using it for? York 8 is spending the fall of 2013 researching and debating different renewable and non-renewable energy sources and their environmental, economic and social impacts to best prepare for our energy future. One of our experts will be Senator Angus King. Our guiding questions are: What energy sources will most sustainably take us into the future? And how does engineering impact our energy future? For final products, students will be making energy transfer machines, creating presentations, and participating in a wind turbine design challenge.

York 8 --Four Freedoms Spring 2012

In the fall of 1941, as the United States considered it's probable entry into World War II, Franklin Roosevelt delivered a State of the Union speech outlining the four freedoms America would fight for: freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from fear, and freedom from want. Norman Rockwell depicted these four freedoms in a now famous series of paintings as part of the U.S. war stamps effort. As students examine these images and what they meant in the 1940’s, they study the concepts and meanings of freedom today through variety of reading assignments, discussions with guest lecturers, movies and other research. Students then express their personal experiences and reflections on the ideas of freedom through a variety of writing and visual art projects, culminating with the Freedom Collages seen in this exhibition.

Based on imagery gathered from a variety of contemporary media and commercial sources, the Freedom Collages are striking commentaries about how students view the nature of freedom in the United States today.

Our Spring Expedition: Motion Commotion Spring 2011

What is engineering? How does engineering impact our lives? How does the design process incorporate math and science?

York eight students will put math and science to work as they design and engineer three dimensional solutions to various problems and challenges during the “Motion Commotion” expedition. Activities from the PBS show “Design Squad” will acquaint students to the engineering process, as they gear up for the much bigger engineering design challenge: Project Gizmo! We will also make connections to real life engineering challenges, such as: How to stop an oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico? How to rescue trapped miners in Chile? How to clean up after an earthquake? And other real life challenges.

Our Fall Expedition: Four Freedoms Fall 2010
See Student Views of the Four Freedoms Expedition Online

In the fall of 1941, as the United States considered it's probable entry into World War II, Franklin Roosevelt delivered a State of the Union speech outlining the four freedoms America would fight for: freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from fear, and freedom from want. Norman Rockwell depicted these four freedoms in a now famous series of paintings as part of the U.S. war stamps effort. As students examine these images and what they meant in the 1940's, they study the concepts and meanings of freedom today through variety of reading assignments, discussions with guest lecturers, movies and other research. Students then express their personal experiences and reflections on the ideas of freedom through a variety of writing and visual art projects, culminating with the Freedom Collages seen in this exhibition.

Based on imagery gathered from a variety of contemporary media and commercial sources, the Freedom Collages are striking commentaries about how students view the nature of freedom in the United States today.

Exploration of freedom, responsibility, and activism in Four Freedoms Spring 2010

King's longest running expedition

In the fall of 1941, as the United States considered it's probable entry into World War II, Franklin Roosevelt delivered a State of the Union speech outlining the four freedoms America would fight for: freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from fear, and freedom from want. Norman Rockwell depicted these four freedoms in a now famous series of paintings as part of the U.S. war stamps effort.

In the Four Freedoms expedition, King students examine Rockwell's paintings and the historical origins of the four freedoms in the context of their own values, images, and perceptions of the world today. Like Rockwell, each student will create a piece of art that captures her or his interpretation of one of the freedoms.

Their work, and the students' artist statements, will be hung in a local gallery.

York 8 takes on art in Portland in Kinetic Conundrums Fall 2009

The city of Portland is home to many pieces of public art ranging from historical to contemporary, and from realistic to abstract. York Eight students will explore this public art and identify how the art reflects the city and its people. Based upon their research, the students will create an on-line guide to public art in Portland.

Additionally, the students will focus on the effects that engineering, math and science have on art. With this knowledge and the help of visiting artist, Jill Dalton, students will create a piece of kinetic art, along with a proposal for the placement of their work, in accordance with the guidelines that the Public Art Committee has developed for our city.

York 8 delves into the contentious past and present of Maine State Pier planning in Pier Pressure Spring 2009 
Take our Pier Survey

Portland's waterfront is ever changing and always in the news. York 8 students will begin looking at the past, present and potential future of the Maine State Pier and the surrounding area. Students will be creating scale plans of a sustainable design for the Maine State Pier. Students will also research the history, the economic and environmental issues, and the viability of their proposed designs. York 8 students will also be looking for parental and community based feedback concerning one of Portland'smost valuable resources.

Four Freedoms expedition culminates, but the discussion continues on lineFall 2008
Student discussions, video debates, and comments are still happening on the blog.

The Four Freedoms expedition culminated in December with an exposition of student collages at the Three Fish Gallery in Portland. Students and community members are welcome to look back at the discussion as well as add comments through the weblog.

Exploration of freedom, responsibility, and activism inFour Freedoms Spring 2008 
King's longest running expedition

In the fall of 1941, as the United States considered it's probable entry into World War II, Franklin Roosevelt delivered a State of the Union speech outlining the four freedoms America would fight for: freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from fear, and freedom from want. Norman Rockwell depicted these four freedoms in a now famous series of paintings as part of the U.S. war stamps effort.

In the Four Freedoms expedition, King students examine Rockwell's paintings and the historical origins of the four freedoms in the context of their own values, images, and perceptions of the world today. Like Rockwell, each student will create a piece of art that captures her or his interpretation of one of the freedoms.

Their work, and the students' artist statements, will be hung in a local gallery.

In The Wide World of Engineering Students Explore the Impact and Ethics of Engineering Fall 2008

What is involved in designing skate boards or skate board parks? Does the idea of designing a roller coaster thrill you? Are you concerned about global warming, and would like to make changes in our lives that have the potential to reverse it? Would you like to help develop artificial limbs, organs, or other implants that can work within the human body?

Who are engineers and what do they do? How do they impact our lives?

York 8 is immersing itself into the world of engineers. We are learning that almost everything that we do - from the moment we get up in the morning, until the moment we go to bed at night - is influenced by the work of an engineer. The students will investigate the many types of engineers, the engineering design process and ways in which engineers use science and math to influence those designs, and the ethical questions that arise as engineers develop their ideas.

York 8 Explores How Engineering Has Transformed Nearly Every Aspect of our Lives Spring 2008

Dr. Kate Sheldon and Michael Bush, both visitors from Idexx, present to York Eight students during theEngineering Your Future Expedition.

What is involved in designing skate boards or skate board parks? Would you like to be able to develop a car with better fuel economy? Does the idea of designing a roller coaster thrill you? Are you interested in global warming, and would like to make changes in our lives that have the potential to reverse it? Would you like to help develop artificial limbs , organs, or other implants that can work within the human body?

Who are engineers and what do they do? How do they impact our lives?

York 8 has immersed itself in the world of engineers. We are learning that almost everything that we do - from the moment we get up in the morning, until the moment we go to bed at night - is influenced by the work of an engineer. 
Each student has researched and written a five paragraph essay on a specific field of engineering, its impacts on our lives, and an innovation that is being developed today. In addition to research, they are taking on the role of the engineer as they design and build their own boats in technology education. A trip to the Landing Boat building School introduced the students to the engineering design and construction of boats first hand, before beginning their own design. As the students develop their understanding of what an engineer does, they are at the same time looking at the underlying principles of physics and mathematics which drive an engineer’s design.